Following up on our series of shareholder engagement blogs, maybe you’ve been doing great during your shareholder engagement efforts. Maybe not. Either way, you can always improve, right?

Our firm’s communications pro – Karen Lisko – says that the most important word in persuasion is the term “you.” Not “we” or “I.” What persuades us is being told how much something affects us. By using the term “you,” you are bringing that message home to them. Ears perk up. Count how many times you use the word “you” in your next persuasive communication. You might be surprised.

And you want to use the term “you” as early as you can in the dialogue. Grab their attention that way. Then keep using the term – if you can – to keep them engaged during the engagement.

Remember to use “you” in the singular. Don’t say “as many of you” or “some of you.” You need to keep making it feel like you’re having a one-on-one conversation with each person in your audience. By broadening the term, you make the listener feel like you see him or her as a glut of people.

Print:
EmailTweetLikeLinkedIn
Photo of Broc Romanek Broc Romanek

As a strategist for the firm’s Corporate & Securities practice, Broc Romanek has a deep understanding of the regulatory and environmental, social, and governance (ESG) marketplace. Prior to joining Perkins Coie, Broc served as editor at TheCorporateCounsel.net, CompensationStandards.com, and DealLawyers.com, where he oversaw…

As a strategist for the firm’s Corporate & Securities practice, Broc Romanek has a deep understanding of the regulatory and environmental, social, and governance (ESG) marketplace. Prior to joining Perkins Coie, Broc served as editor at TheCorporateCounsel.net, CompensationStandards.com, and DealLawyers.com, where he oversaw and managed coverage on issues related to ESG, corporate governance, executive pay, deals, and market trends and analysis.

In addition to his nearly two decades of working as a journalist and publisher, Broc served as assistant general counsel at a Fortune 50 company, worked in the Office of Chief Counsel of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Division of Corporation Finance, was a counselor to former SEC Commissioner Laura Unger, and worked in private practice. He also is the author, or co-author, of four legal treatises, and has authored several books focused on the legal industry.