This is the second of the 21 hats that the corporate secretary wears (here’s the blog about the first hat): When you’re wearing 21 hats, you’d better be organized. Otherwise, there’s no way you can cope with all that you need to handle. So perhaps this skill is the most critical for the corporate secretarial role. The glue.

You need to pay attention to detail—while at the same time, keep everyone on task. It’s your level of customer service that will allow you to have board meetings that reflect your company’s culture. That customer service is going to allow you to have an efficient board, an effective board, and a board that really feels that the company respects their time and commitment.

So, you’re a hand-holder to the degree that is reasonable and makes sense for this particular board.

Along those lines, knowing each of the director’s comfort level is critical, whether it’s how well they know technology, the level and format of the board materials you give them, or if they’re able and willing to participate in engagement with investors. Know what their skill sets are – and what they need.

You’re always looking to remove friction. Make sure the directors are comfortable – and that they can focus on the key parts of their jobs.

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Photo of Broc Romanek Broc Romanek

As a strategist for the firm’s Corporate & Securities practice, Broc Romanek has a deep understanding of the regulatory and environmental, social, and governance (ESG) marketplace. Prior to joining Perkins Coie, Broc served as editor at TheCorporateCounsel.net, CompensationStandards.com, and DealLawyers.com, where he oversaw…

As a strategist for the firm’s Corporate & Securities practice, Broc Romanek has a deep understanding of the regulatory and environmental, social, and governance (ESG) marketplace. Prior to joining Perkins Coie, Broc served as editor at TheCorporateCounsel.net, CompensationStandards.com, and DealLawyers.com, where he oversaw and managed coverage on issues related to ESG, corporate governance, executive pay, deals, and market trends and analysis.

In addition to his nearly two decades of working as a journalist and publisher, Broc served as assistant general counsel at a Fortune 50 company, worked in the Office of Chief Counsel of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Division of Corporation Finance, was a counselor to former SEC Commissioner Laura Unger, and worked in private practice. He also is the author, or co-author, of four legal treatises, and has authored several books focused on the legal industry.